New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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Hong Kong

  • at Lewis Silkin
  • at Lewis Silkin
  • at Lewis Silkin

As a result of the covid-19 pandemic, many companies in Hong Kong encouraged their staff to work remotely. This meant taking documents home from the office and using video conferencing, cloud computing and intranet platforms, where those software solutions were available, and also using personal devices to work more. As a result, confidentiality and security of data became more at risk.

Due to space constraints in Hong Kong, it is not practicable to expect employees to work or conduct confidential discussions in an isolated area away from others. Often employees are sharing workspace with family members and may also share a laptop or PC with them. If working from home is not an option for an employee, he or she may be working from cafes or public spaces. As a result, non-employees may overhear confidential discussions or see confidential documents. If these conversations and documents contain personal data (of employees, customers, clients, suppliers or other third parties), then the potential leakage of this data may constitute a breach of the Personal Data (Privacy) Ordinance (PDPO). There may also be contractual confidentiality breaches.

A typical home network is unlikely to have the same stringent security protections in place that an office network does. Attackers have seen an opportunity to steal user credentials from personal devices, which are now being used for work and likely do not have the same security protections as corporate devices. Using unsecured networks and devices may lead to data leakage or theft, which would be in breach of the PDPO.

If personal data is being processed by new third parties as a result of having to implement remote-working arrangements, an employer will need to notify its employees of this. This can be done by issuing employees with a revised or new Personal Information Collection Statement (PICS) setting out the change. The PDPO specifies that a data user, when collecting personal data directly from a data subject, must take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure that the data subject is informed of the intended use of their data and who will be handling such data. A PICS is therefore used to comply with these notification requirements and is a statement regarding a data user’s privacy policies and practices in relation to the personal data it handles. 

Last updated on 11/10/2021

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

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Hong Kong

  • at Lewis Silkin
  • at Lewis Silkin
  • at Lewis Silkin

Unless the employee has a clear policy or a contractual provision that permits it to reduce salaries or benefits in this situation, it is unlikely that the employer could lawfully make such reductions without the employee’s consent. Where an employee has elected to work remotely and there is such a policy or contractual provision in place, the reduction in salary or benefits is unlikely to be challenged by the employee. Where an employee has been forced to work remotely by their employer (due to covid-19 or otherwise), such a reduction may be challenged as the remote working has not occurred at the employee’s request.

Generally, if an employer changes an employee’s salary or benefits unilaterally, an employee could bring potential claims against it for unlawful deduction from wages, unreasonable variation of employment terms or constructive dismissal.

Last updated on 11/10/2021