New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

The rules for monitoring employees do not differ between teleworkers and office workers. Thus, like any employee, teleworkers must be informed in advance of the methods and techniques used to monitor his or her activity (article L. 1222-3 of the labour code).

The implementation of a device allowing the control of the employee's working time must be justified by the nature of the task to be performed and proportionate to the purpose (National Agreement of 26 November 2020).

The CNIL said in a Q/A on 12 November 2020 that the devices used to monitor employees’ activity must not be aimed at trapping employees and cannot lead to permanent surveillance of employees. Thus, audio or video devices, permanent screen-sharing or keyloggers must not be implemented.

If the employer exercises excessive surveillance on his employee, it may receive a financial penalty.

Finally, the CNIL advises employers to prioritise monitoring the completion of missions by setting objectives rather than monitoring the working time or the daily activity of employees.

Last updated on 21/09/2021