New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

Employers must ensure the protection of their company’s data but also of employees’ data.

According to article L. 1222-10 of the French labour code, the employer must inform the teleworking employee of the company's rules regarding data protection and any restrictions on the use of computer equipment or tools. Once informed, the employee must respect these rules.

The collective national agreement of 26 November 2020, provides more details in article 3.1.4. It is the employer's responsibility to take necessary measures to protect the personal data of a teleworking employee and the data of anyone else the employee processes during their activity, in compliance with the GDPR of 27 April 2016 and the rulings of the National Commission for Technology and Civil Liberties (the CNIL).

The CNIL said in its 12 November 2020 Q&A on teleworking that employers are responsible for the security of their company's personal data, including when they are stored on terminals over which they do not have physical or legal control (eg, employee's personal computer) but whose use they have authorised to access the company's IT resources.

The National Agreement of 26 November 2020 recommends three practices:

  • the establishment of minimum instructions to be respected in teleworking, and the communication of this document to all employees;
  • providing employees with a list of communication and collaborative work tools appropriate for teleworking, which guarantee the confidentiality of discussions and shared data; and
  • the possibility of setting up protocols that guarantee confidentiality and authentication of the recipient server for all communications.
Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Sweden

  • at DLA Piper
  • at DLA Piper
  • at DLA Piper

Pursuant to the GDPR, personal data should, inter alia, be processed in a manner that ensures appropriate security and confidentiality for the processing of that data, including by preventing unauthorised access to or use of personal data. For natural reasons, there may be additional challenges associated with this obligation when employees are working remotely, including an increased risk of personal data breaches when employees are working from home. The Swedish Authority for Privacy Protection mentions in its Privacy Protection Report of 2020 the increase in employees working from home as a result of the covid-19 pandemic, and the increased use of cloud service providers. The Authority highlights that data in cloud services is often transferred to countries outside the EU/EEA, and especially to the US. As a result of the Schrems II ruling in 2020, the use of, eg, cloud service providers that transfer data to  such jurisdictions (eg, in connection with IT maintenance) is problematic and may need to be addressed in relation to remote working.   

In light of the above, it is important as an employer to consider what measures are necessary in terms of IT security when working from home (eg, instructions to employees).

Last updated on 21/09/2021

03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

The rules for monitoring employees do not differ between teleworkers and office workers. Thus, like any employee, teleworkers must be informed in advance of the methods and techniques used to monitor his or her activity (article L. 1222-3 of the labour code).

The implementation of a device allowing the control of the employee's working time must be justified by the nature of the task to be performed and proportionate to the purpose (National Agreement of 26 November 2020).

The CNIL said in a Q/A on 12 November 2020 that the devices used to monitor employees’ activity must not be aimed at trapping employees and cannot lead to permanent surveillance of employees. Thus, audio or video devices, permanent screen-sharing or keyloggers must not be implemented.

If the employer exercises excessive surveillance on his employee, it may receive a financial penalty.

Finally, the CNIL advises employers to prioritise monitoring the completion of missions by setting objectives rather than monitoring the working time or the daily activity of employees.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Sweden

  • at DLA Piper
  • at DLA Piper
  • at DLA Piper

From a privacy perspective, employers must consider the GDPR and other privacy-related legislation. The GDPR states, inter alia, that the processing of personal data must be adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary concerning the purposes for which they are processed (ie, the data minimisation principle). This means that the employer’s monitoring of employees cannot be too intrusive – it must be proportionate for the purpose. Furthermore, employers must be able to demonstrate that the purpose of the processing cannot be fulfilled by other, less-intrusive, means. Employers must also adhere to other GDPR requirements, eg, providing employees with information about the data processing in advance. Further, employers must always act in accordance with good practices in the Swedish labour market.

When it comes to employees’ use of email and the internet, the Swedish Authority for Privacy Protection recommends that employers have guidelines for internet use and e-mail. The guidelines should clearly state what type of private use is permitted, and also when the employer may consider controlling employees’ internet or e-mail use. Depending on the situation, it may be lawful to carry out inspections of an employee’s online usage. If there is a concrete suspicion that an employee is acting in breach of his or her employment contract, it may be lawful to monitor that employee, subject to complying with the GDPR and other privacy legislation. Employees must be informed about inspections or monitoring that may take place.

In terms of time tracking, the Swedish Working Hours Act also applies to remote working, meaning that the same limits on overtime and provisions on minimum daily rest periods must be observed. In some circumstances, however, such as when the work is performed without employer supervision or control, the Working Hours Act may not apply. There are no general guidelines on when the exemption is applicable, but it should be applied restrictively and is rarely applicable in the case of remote working. Employers should therefore engage in dialogue with employees on their working time to ensure compliance with the Working Hours Act.

Last updated on 24/01/2022

10. Are there some workplaces or specific industries or sectors in which the government has required that employers make access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination?

10. Are there some workplaces or specific industries or sectors in which the government has required that employers make access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination?

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

Please see above (questions 8 and 9) regarding the workplaces and specific industries concerned by making the access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Sweden

  • at DLA Piper
  • at DLA Piper
  • at DLA Piper

There are no such requirements for any sector. There are currently no recommendations from relevant Swedish authorities that employers should treat unvaccinated employees differently to vaccinated employees.

Last updated on 21/09/2021