New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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01. Has the government introduced any laws and/or issued guidelines around remote-working arrangements? If so, what categories of worker do the laws and/or guidelines apply to – do they extend to “gig” workers and other independent contractors?

01. Has the government introduced any laws and/or issued guidelines around remote-working arrangements? If so, what categories of worker do the laws and/or guidelines apply to – do they extend to “gig” workers and other independent contractors?

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Portugal

  • at Cuatrecasas
  • at Cuatrecasas

The Portuguese Labour Code established the legal regime for remote working, in particular teleworking, in 2003. This provided employers with a general framework for this kind of arrangement. During the covid-19 pandemic and its successive lockdowns, a vast array of legislation on telework was issued, given the specificity of the situation.

Back in March 2020, the teleworking regime could be unilaterally imposed by an employer or requested by employees, without the need for an agreement of the parties provided that it was compatible with the employees’ functions. Independent contractors were excluded from the scope of this regime.

Due to the evolution of the pandemic, it was then determined that teleworking should be mandatory, regardless of the employment relationship (including contractors), whenever employees’ functions allowed it. In this context, measures were also adopted to promote the compulsory implementation of teleworking within the scope of civil servants, whenever this was compatible with the functions being performed.

With the reduction in the number of covid-19 cases, in summer 2020 teleworking was no longer mandatory and the legal regime foreseen in the Portuguese Labour Code was solely applicable.

However, the increase of covid-19 infections led to the adoption of new measures in October 2020, which determined the promotion of teleworking whenever the nature of the activity allowed it. Considering the number of outbreaks, it quickly evolved to a point when teleworking became mandatory in the regions with a higher risk of infection.

It was only in November 2020 that teleworking was established as mandatory for companies that were the final users or beneficiaries of services provided by independent contractors, service providers and temporary employees.

After Christmas 2020 and with the new lockdown, teleworking once again became mandatory across the country. Despite a government announcement in March 2021 that teleworking would be mandatory until the end of the year, due to the success of the national vaccination programme teleworking ceased to be mandatory from 1 August 2021.

Council of Ministers Resolution No.181-A/2021 decreed mandatory teleworking between 25 December 2021 and 9 January 2022, which was then extended until 14 January 2022.

Other than this period of mandatory teleworking, at the end of 2021 Law No. 83/2021 was passed, which entered into force on 1 January 2022. This law modified the teleworking regime, introducing several changes to the Labour Code and to Law 98/2009 on work accidents and occupational diseases.

This new law states that provisions on equipment and systems; organisation, direction, and control of work; special obligations; privacy; and health and safety at work apply to all situations of remote work without legal subordination, but with economic dependence. The extension and scope of such obligations are unclear, but it is doubtful that this new teleworking regime was intended to accommodate “gig economy” workers and other independent contractors. It is more likely to have a residual character, to prevent situations where it is unclear if one is dealing with an employment contract or a service provision (eg, home workers), as this may change crucial rules on privacy or health and safety.

Last updated on 08/07/2022