New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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Belgium

  • at Van Olmen & Wynant

Employees who process data at home could create a data leak when they lose the data or improperly dispose of it after it is no longer useful for the company. It is also more difficult to protect digital data in a non-professional setting and a private network might be more vulnerable to breaches.

Article 9.3 of CBA No. 149 states that company data used and processed by teleworkers for professional purposes must be protected. Employers should inform teleworkers of the company's rules on data protection and, in particular, the restrictions and penalties for the misuse of IT equipment and tools. Considering this, it is strongly recommended for companies to draft and implement an IT policy.

Also, employees’ personal data could be at risk since teleworking often means a direct insight into the personal life of the employee, using remote-monitoring devices. Such devices or software could register data that is not purely linked to their work and might possibly breach several GDPR principles, such as data minimisation.

Last updated on 21/09/2021