New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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01. Has the government introduced any laws and/or issued guidelines around remote-working arrangements? If so, what categories of worker do the laws and/or guidelines apply to – do they extend to “gig” workers and other independent contractors?

01. Has the government introduced any laws and/or issued guidelines around remote-working arrangements? If so, what categories of worker do the laws and/or guidelines apply to – do they extend to “gig” workers and other independent contractors?

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Belgium

  • at Van Olmen & Wynant

For several periods during the pandemic, the government strongly recommended remote work or even made it mandatory, except for where remote work was not possible. The requirement to perform remote work was lifted on 27 June 2021. However, a fourth wave of infection in November 2021, caused the government to introduce a new obligation for workers to perform remote work at least four days a week. Employers have to register who in their workforce is capable or not capable of doing remote work through an online social security platform (used by the social inspection to enforce the obligation).

Belgium already recognised three legal systems for remote work or “teleworking”. There is the system for homeworking (the oldest form of teleworking without the use of technology); since 2005, the system for structural teleworking (for more permanent forms of remote work) based on the European Framework Agreement on teleworking of 2002; and since 2017, the system for occasional teleworking (eg, for situations of force majeure). When the government made remote work mandatory during the pandemic, it was unclear which system would apply to this “corona-teleworking”.

Aiming to bring an end to the discussions and to provide a general framework, the national social partners concluded Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) No. 149 regarding recommended or compulsory teleworking caused by the coronavirus crisis on 26 January 2021, which applies to the private sector. However, this CBA did not bring any clarity on the discussion regarding the applicable teleworking system during the pandemic, given that it only applies to organisations that had not yet implemented one of the existing teleworking systems. The other systems for teleworking, therefore, still apply to this situation in some organisations. Independent contractors and gig workers (as far as they can be considered self-employed) do not fall under the scope of this CBA. However, self-employed workers are also forbidden from workplaces if they can work remotely (except for one day a week).

Last updated on 25/01/2022

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

The first French law on teleworking was adopted on 22 March 2012. It was subsequently modified by an ordinance dated 22 September 2017. Today, three articles of the labour code cover the implementation and the functioning of teleworking (articles L. 1222-9 to L. 1222-11). In addition, two national collective agreements were concluded between employers' representatives and trade unions in 2005[1] and 2020.[2]

The definitions of teleworking given by article L. 1222-9 and by the agreement of 19 July 2005 provide that the rules on teleworking only apply to employees with an employment contract. These rules do not apply to self-employed workers.


[1] National collective agreement on Teleworking – July 19, 2005

[2] National collective agreement for a successful implementation of teleworking – November 26, 2020

Last updated on 21/09/2021

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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Belgium

  • at Van Olmen & Wynant

Employees who process data at home could create a data leak when they lose the data or improperly dispose of it after it is no longer useful for the company. It is also more difficult to protect digital data in a non-professional setting and a private network might be more vulnerable to breaches.

Article 9.3 of CBA No. 149 states that company data used and processed by teleworkers for professional purposes must be protected. Employers should inform teleworkers of the company's rules on data protection and, in particular, the restrictions and penalties for the misuse of IT equipment and tools. Considering this, it is strongly recommended for companies to draft and implement an IT policy.

Also, employees’ personal data could be at risk since teleworking often means a direct insight into the personal life of the employee, using remote-monitoring devices. Such devices or software could register data that is not purely linked to their work and might possibly breach several GDPR principles, such as data minimisation.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

Employers must ensure the protection of their company’s data but also of employees’ data.

According to article L. 1222-10 of the French labour code, the employer must inform the teleworking employee of the company's rules regarding data protection and any restrictions on the use of computer equipment or tools. Once informed, the employee must respect these rules.

The collective national agreement of 26 November 2020, provides more details in article 3.1.4. It is the employer's responsibility to take necessary measures to protect the personal data of a teleworking employee and the data of anyone else the employee processes during their activity, in compliance with the GDPR of 27 April 2016 and the rulings of the National Commission for Technology and Civil Liberties (the CNIL).

The CNIL said in its 12 November 2020 Q&A on teleworking that employers are responsible for the security of their company's personal data, including when they are stored on terminals over which they do not have physical or legal control (eg, employee's personal computer) but whose use they have authorised to access the company's IT resources.

The National Agreement of 26 November 2020 recommends three practices:

  • the establishment of minimum instructions to be respected in teleworking, and the communication of this document to all employees;
  • providing employees with a list of communication and collaborative work tools appropriate for teleworking, which guarantee the confidentiality of discussions and shared data; and
  • the possibility of setting up protocols that guarantee confidentiality and authentication of the recipient server for all communications.
Last updated on 21/09/2021

10. Are there some workplaces or specific industries or sectors in which the government has required that employers make access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination?

10. Are there some workplaces or specific industries or sectors in which the government has required that employers make access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination?

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Belgium

  • at Van Olmen & Wynant

Until now, there have been no such requirements. But as stated above, this will be the case in the healthcare sector, starting from 1 April 2022.

Last updated on 01/12/2021

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France

  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose
  • at Proskauer Rose

Please see above (questions 8 and 9) regarding the workplaces and specific industries concerned by making the access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination.

Last updated on 21/09/2021