New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

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Austria

  • at Littler
  • at Littler
  • at Littler

Relevant here are first the restrictions on the employer's control of working time. Both the Working Time Act and the Rest Periods Act also apply to remote work and to work in a home office. However, section 26 paragraph 3 of the Working Time Act provides that in the case of work that is predominantly carried out in the home, only records of the duration (not the specific beginning and end) of the working time are to be kept. If the working hours are fixed, only deviations must be recorded.

The practical possibilities of monitoring work performance are manifold due to the IT tools that are now available (eg, log files, webcam). In contrast, in Austrian labour law, the employer's ability to control is subject to important restrictions. Control measures that affect human dignity require either the consent of the works council or – if such a council does not exist – the consent of the respective worker. Both attendance and performance or productivity controls can be relevant here. According to case law, the question of whether human dignity is affected must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. In addition to the employer's interest in monitoring, the way the monitoring is carried out is also decisive, so that the possibility of constant electronic monitoring (for example, by controlling keystrokes or screen duplication) certainly affects human dignity[1].

However, it is of course lawful to check the availability of employees during working hours.


[1] Huger in Huger (Hrsg), Home Office und mobiles Arbeiten [2021] Rechtliche Rahmenbedingungen.

Last updated on 21/09/2021