New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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Austria

  • at Littler
  • at Littler
  • at Littler

The potential data protection risks associated with remote working are largely equivalent to those associated with working in a regular workplace, but are arguably even more prevalent.

A significant potential risk factor is the transfer of personal data if it is no longer securely stored on a company's servers. In addition, employers thereby transfer responsibility for the safekeeping and use of sensitive data to the worker. In doing so, employers have a significantly reduced ability to exert any influence. Nevertheless, companies are still generally regarded as being responsible for data protection within the meaning of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which creates a certain amount of friction.

It is also questionable whether a so-called privacy impact assessment must be carried out when working in a home office.

In principle, such an assessment must be conducted if data processing – especially when using new technologies – is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons due to the nature, scope, circumstances, and purposes of the processing.

At present, it cannot be assumed that the threshold for the use of new technologies has already been exceeded in the context of remote working. In individual cases, however, it could amount to an "organisational solution" within the meaning of the GDPR, which also triggers the obligation of a privacy impact assessment by the data controller.

Insecure data connections that might not be constantly checked and maintained should also be considered. Another potential risk arises from it being easier for third parties to obtain access to sensitive data, whether it be persons in the same household or others at public places of work.

From a legal perspective, compliance with data security can also be adequately ensured for remote work, considering the GDPR and the corresponding national legal basis (Austrian Data Protection Act).

In home-office agreements, however, it is advisable to make further reference to data protection aspects. Here, companies should refer to the secure and data protection-compliant transport of sensitive hardware. Additionally, companies should take technical and organisational measures to ensure data security (eg, use of VPN, two-factor authentication with mobile phones, encryption of USB sticks, provision of a LAN network, requirements for secure storage of access data).

Last updated on 21/09/2021

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

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Austria

  • at Littler
  • at Littler
  • at Littler

Employers cannot unilaterally reduce employees' salaries because of remote work. A salary reduction is only possible either by mutual agreement or through a dismissal, with the option of re-employment on altered conditions.

Regarding benefits, we believe that a distinction must be made according to whether they were granted with working on office premises in mind and whether the employer has reserved a right to revoke them. In the latter case, employers may reduce or revoke benefits unilaterally. In addition, it can also be argued that, for example, meal vouchers for the company canteen are no longer issued and are not reimbursed. Such and other “social benefits by the company” can be limited to use at the company’s workplace.

Last updated on 21/09/2021