New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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01. Has the government introduced any laws and/or issued guidelines around remote-working arrangements? If so, what categories of worker do the laws and/or guidelines apply to – do they extend to “gig” workers and other independent contractors?

01. Has the government introduced any laws and/or issued guidelines around remote-working arrangements? If so, what categories of worker do the laws and/or guidelines apply to – do they extend to “gig” workers and other independent contractors?

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France

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The first French law on teleworking was adopted on 22 March 2012. It was subsequently modified by an ordinance dated 22 September 2017. Today, three articles of the labour code cover the implementation and the functioning of teleworking (articles L. 1222-9 to L. 1222-11). In addition, two national collective agreements were concluded between employers' representatives and trade unions in 2005[1] and 2020.[2]

The definitions of teleworking given by article L. 1222-9 and by the agreement of 19 July 2005 provide that the rules on teleworking only apply to employees with an employment contract. These rules do not apply to self-employed workers.


[1] National collective agreement on Teleworking – July 19, 2005

[2] National collective agreement for a successful implementation of teleworking – November 26, 2020

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Mexico passed a reform to the Federal Labor Law (FLL) concerning teleworking (remote working) in January 2021. According to the FLL, remote working applies under the following conditions: (i) employees’ services are not required in the employer's facilities; (ii) employees constantly provide their services outside of the employer's facilities; (iii) employees carry out more than 40% of their work outside of the office; and (iv) technology is used for the administration of the labour relationship and supervision of the performed services.

The Mexican legislation on remote working, however, does not exclude or limit the possibility of remote working for employees based on their position; this scheme may be negotiated by an employer with its employees through an agreement.

“Gig” workers and independent contractors are treated equally and not considered employees, so telework guidelines do not apply to their services. However, if the service provider files a lawsuit before the Labour Board claiming the existence of an employment relationship, the beneficiary of the services must prove that the service provider was not under his control, supervision, or exclusive dependence.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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France

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Employers must ensure the protection of their company’s data but also of employees’ data.

According to article L. 1222-10 of the French labour code, the employer must inform the teleworking employee of the company's rules regarding data protection and any restrictions on the use of computer equipment or tools. Once informed, the employee must respect these rules.

The collective national agreement of 26 November 2020, provides more details in article 3.1.4. It is the employer's responsibility to take necessary measures to protect the personal data of a teleworking employee and the data of anyone else the employee processes during their activity, in compliance with the GDPR of 27 April 2016 and the rulings of the National Commission for Technology and Civil Liberties (the CNIL).

The CNIL said in its 12 November 2020 Q&A on teleworking that employers are responsible for the security of their company's personal data, including when they are stored on terminals over which they do not have physical or legal control (eg, employee's personal computer) but whose use they have authorised to access the company's IT resources.

The National Agreement of 26 November 2020 recommends three practices:

  • the establishment of minimum instructions to be respected in teleworking, and the communication of this document to all employees;
  • providing employees with a list of communication and collaborative work tools appropriate for teleworking, which guarantee the confidentiality of discussions and shared data; and
  • the possibility of setting up protocols that guarantee confidentiality and authentication of the recipient server for all communications.
Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Security controls

The common risks associated with remote working derive from the absence of security controls over equipment, software, and data, and not having any policies for remote-working schemes, leading to:

  • employees storing sensitive information in their local machines, without the control of employers over such tools;
  • compromised security controls; and
  • Wi-Fi networks and routers in homes are more easily compromised, increasing the risk of exposure.

Companies have the right to install security controls for the equipment and tools to be used by teleworkers to avoid any leaks of information and limit their use, because this hardware is the property of the employer. The common practice in Mexico is to implement a security data policy and a work tools policy.

Additionally, even though there are no specific legal provisions concerning the plausible risks associated with data protection in remote-working schemes, the Federal Law for the Protection of Personal Data in Possession of Private Individuals or Entities, the Federal Law for the Protection of Industrial Property, and their regulations and guidelines, establish provisions for the protection of rights concerning personal data, confidential information, and trade secrets, which also apply to remote-working schemes; therefore, all employees working remotely must comply with these laws and regulations. To prevent and avoid the disclosure of this information, the prevailing practice is to enter into agreements with employees establishing specific obligations in connection to confidentiality and data privacy. Such obligations usually refer to the policies and processes established by employers to ensure information security, and the corresponding penalties in the event of any breach.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

03. What are the limits on employer monitoring of worker activity in the context of a remote-working arrangement and what other factors should employers bear in mind when monitoring worker activity remotely?

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France

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The rules for monitoring employees do not differ between teleworkers and office workers. Thus, like any employee, teleworkers must be informed in advance of the methods and techniques used to monitor his or her activity (article L. 1222-3 of the labour code).

The implementation of a device allowing the control of the employee's working time must be justified by the nature of the task to be performed and proportionate to the purpose (National Agreement of 26 November 2020).

The CNIL said in a Q/A on 12 November 2020 that the devices used to monitor employees’ activity must not be aimed at trapping employees and cannot lead to permanent surveillance of employees. Thus, audio or video devices, permanent screen-sharing or keyloggers must not be implemented.

If the employer exercises excessive surveillance on his employee, it may receive a financial penalty.

Finally, the CNIL advises employers to prioritise monitoring the completion of missions by setting objectives rather than monitoring the working time or the daily activity of employees.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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According to article 330-I of the amended FLL; the mechanisms employed to monitor teleworkers must be proportional to their purpose; employers must always guarantee the employees’ right to privacy; and the legal framework for protecting personal data must be complied with.

Additionally, activity monitoring must be limited to employees’ working hours and digital connectivity, be transparent, and the employer must respect the employees’ right to disconnect, meaning that they need to respect employees’ time off and must never expect their availability outside of working hours. Further, webcams are not mandatory, and employees have the right to refuse to turn them on.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

04. Are employers required to provide work equipment (for example, computers and other digital devices) or to pay for or reimburse employees for costs associated with remote working (for example, internet and electricity costs)?

04. Are employers required to provide work equipment (for example, computers and other digital devices) or to pay for or reimburse employees for costs associated with remote working (for example, internet and electricity costs)?

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France

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French law has no provision for this.

It is, therefore, necessary to refer to the two national agreements of 2005 and 2020. These agreements stipulate that the costs incurred by the employee in the performance of his or her employment contract are borne by the employer. This obligation also applies to teleworkers. However, the national agreement of 2020 sets a few conditions for this coverage: the prior validation of the employer, the expense must be incurred for the needs of the professional activity of the employee and in the interests of the company.

The organisation responsible for collecting social security contributions (URSSAF) has issued a list of expenses that must be covered by the employer. These costs include ink cartridges, paper, telephone and internet subscriptions, electricity, heating, a proportion of rent in certain cases (see below) and home insurance.

The terms and conditions for covering business expenses (maximum amount, the procedure to follow, etc.) may be defined unilaterally by the employer, by mutual agreement between the employee and the employer, or by a collective agreement between the employer and the company's unions. Article 3.1.5 of the national agreement of 2020 and the Ministry of Labour recommend doing everything possible to reach an agreement between the employer and the unions.

If teleworking becomes permanent and the employee no longer has an office on the company's premises, the employer must pay a home occupation allowance.[3]

As for the use of the employee's personal equipment, the principle is that the employer must provide the employee with a computer for teleworking. However, if the employee agrees, they can use their personal equipment (article 7 of the national agreement of 19 July 2005).


[3] Cass. Soc, 14 septembre 2016, n°14-21.893

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Yes, employers must provide, install, and maintain the necessary supplies and equipment (for example, computers, ergonomic chairs, and printers); pay any expenses arising from teleworking, such as internet, communication and electricity services; keep a registry of the supplies delivered to the teleworkers in compliance with workplace health and safety provisions; and establish the necessary training and advisory mechanisms to guarantee the adoption and adequate use of information technology.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

05. What potential issues and risks arise for employers in the context of cross-border remote-working arrangements?

05. What potential issues and risks arise for employers in the context of cross-border remote-working arrangements?

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France

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Cross-border remote working can accentuate some of the problems caused by teleworking or create new ones.

Among the existing problems, the loss of social ties is accentuated if the teleworker decides to work from another country. Indeed, the employee abroad will never physically see his colleagues, which will create a distance between the employee working from abroad and other employees.

Similarly, employers must ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers (article L. 4121-1 labour code). This is a difficult obligation to meet in teleworking, especially because employers do not have access to remote employees’ workplaces. It is even more difficult if the employee works from another country because the sanitary, electrical and other standards are different and potentially less protective than French rules.

As for social security law, in principle, the employee depends on the social security system of the country where they work. The employee can only continue to benefit from the French social security system if they are in a secondment situation. Moreover, this is only a temporary solution because the secondment implies a temporary mission. The employer will therefore have to register the employee with the social security system of the country where they are working, which will cause problems in terms of social contributions.

Another question that may arise is whether an employer should accept a work stoppage prescribed by a foreign doctor.

Finally, another problem that may arise is the employee's right to disconnect. Indeed, the employer and the employee must agree on a time slot during which the employee can not be contacted to respect his private life as much as possible.[4] It can be difficult to establish a time slot that suits both the employee and the employer in case of major time zone discrepancies.


[4] National agreement of November 26, 2020

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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If employees are hired under Mexican law, they will be entitled to the same mandatory benefits and social security as any other employee in Mexico; therefore, they must be registered with the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) and must comply with employment tax obligations, which include payroll taxes and income tax on their salaries.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

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France

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Teleworkers have the same rights as employees who work from a company's premises (article L. 1222-9 III of the Labor Code).

Employers cannot modify employees’ remuneration without obtaining agreement.[5] This rule also applies to teleworkers.

In some countries such as the United States, employers can adjust the remuneration of teleworking employees to the cost of living in the employee's place of residence. This practice is not prohibited in France but the employer must be careful in doing so as it could constitute discrimination based on the place of residence, which is prohibited by the labour code[6]if it is not justified by objective elements. 

However, employers can withdraw a few benefits from teleworking employees. Indeed, even if the Ministry of Labor says in a Q&A that the telecommuting employee must receive lunch vouchers like other employees, some jurisdictions believe that the employer can stop paying these vouchers to teleworkers because they are not in a comparable situation to employees who work from a company's premises.[7]

As for transportation costs, the employer must cover half of the cost of the transportation pass used to travel to the office and to return home from the office (article L. 3261-2 of the labour code). If the employee does not have to travel to work during the month, the employer does not have to pay transportation costs.


[5] Cass. Soc, 18 oct. 2006, n°05-41.644

[6] Article L. 1132-1 Labour code

[7]TJ Nanterre, 10 mars 2021, n° 20/09616

 

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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No, any reductions to employees’ salaries or benefits are considered a unilateral modification to employment conditions, and therefore are grounds for justified rescission of the employment contract with total responsibility attributed to the employer. If this were to happen, severance will have to be paid as if it were an unjustified dismissal.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

08. Can employers require or mandate that their workers receive a covid-19 vaccination? If so, what options does an employer have in the event an employee refuses to receive a covid-19 vaccination?

08. Can employers require or mandate that their workers receive a covid-19 vaccination? If so, what options does an employer have in the event an employee refuses to receive a covid-19 vaccination?

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France

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Employers can require that their employees are vaccinated only if the vaccination is made mandatory by the French Public Health Code.

In France, vaccination against covid-19 has not been made mandatory (except for health professionals). Therefore, French employers cannot force their employees to be vaccinated. However, they can recommend it to their employees without forcing them (please note that due to the Law of 5 August 2021, employees are entitled to leave to attend covid-19 vaccination appointments).

Please note that a law was passed by Parliament on 5 August 2021 and states:

  1. To make access to certain places, establishments or events conditional upon the presentation of either a negative PCR test, or proof of vaccination status concerning covid-19, or a certificate of recovery following covid-19 infection.

This would only cover the following activities:

  • recreational activities;
  • bars and restaurants (except company restaurants), including terraces;
  • department stores and shopping centres by decision of the Prefect of the district in the event of risks of contamination under conditions guaranteeing access to essential shops and transport;
  • seminars and trade fairs;
  • public transport (trains, buses, planes) for long journeys; and
  • hospitals, homes for the elderly and retirement homes for companions, visitors and patients receiving care (except in medical emergencies).

In those specific cases, from 30 August 2021, an employer undertaking the above activities may ask their employees to present one of these documents, including proof of vaccination status. If an employee is unable to present such documents and chose, in agreement with their employer, to not use paid holidays, the employer can suspend the employee’s contract, on the same day. This suspension, which can lead to an interruption of salary, ends as soon as the employee produces the required proof.

If the suspension goes beyond three working days, the employer shall invite the employee to a meeting to attempt to rectify the situation, including the possibility of temporarily reassigning the employee to another position within the company not subject to this obligation.

  1. Mandatory vaccination for health professionals, including those working in an occupational health service according to article L.4622-1 of the labour code.

The health professionals listed in article 12 of the law of 5 August 2021 (doctors, nurses, doctors working in occupational health services, osteopaths etc) must be vaccinated as of 9 August 2021, unless there is a medical contraindication or a certificate of recovery can be presented.

Please note that the law provides for a transition period as follows:

  • up to and including 14 September, the staff concerned may present a negative test  that is less than 72 hours old (RT-PCR screening test, antigen test or self-test carried out under the supervision of a health professional) if they are not vaccinated;
  • between 15 September and 15 October inclusive, when an employee has received the first dose of vaccine, he or she may continue to work provided that he or she can present a negative test result; and
  • from 16 October 2021, they must present proof of the complete vaccination schedule.

This obligation does not apply to people who perform occasional tasks. The Ministry of Labour defines “occasional tasks” as a very brief and non-recurring intervention that is not linked to the normal and permanent activity of the company. Workers who carry out these tasks are not integrated into the workgroup and their activity is not public-facing.

This may include, for example, the intervention of a delivery company or an urgent repair.

On the other hand, the following are not occasional tasks: carrying out heavy work in a company (eg, renovation of a building) or cleaning services, because of their recurrent nature.

When carrying out an occasional task, the workers concerned must ensure that they comply with social distancing rules.

Employees who have not presented one of these documents can no longer work. Thus, when an employer finds that an employee can no longer carry out their work, the employee must be informed without delay of the consequences of this prohibition, as well as the means to rectify the situation. A dialogue between the employee and employer to discuss ways of rectifying this situation is encouraged.  An employee who is prohibited from working may, with the employer's agreement, use days of rest or paid leave. Otherwise, their employment contract will be suspended.

The suspension of the contract, which leads to the interruption of salary, ends as soon as the employee fulfils the conditions necessary to continue working.

When the employer or the regional health agency finds that a health professional has not been able to carry out their role for more than 30 days, it informs the national council of the order to which they belong.

Please note that, according to the law of 5 August 2021, the employer must inform the new works council (CSE) of measures taken to implement any obligations to verify the vaccination of health professionals or the health passes of employees who come under the aforementioned sectors.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Employers are not authorised to mandate or demand employees to receive a covid-19 vaccination. If an employee refuses the covid-19 vaccine, their employer may not terminate their employment contract or impose any other sanction. However, employers may implement preventive measures according to the provisions for the reopening of workplaces, which employees must comply with. If an employee does not comply with such preventive measures or policies, their employer can terminate the employment contract with justifiable cause. It is important to mention that the employer must have abundant evidence of a policy breach by the employee for the termination to be justifiable if a lawsuit were to be filed by a dismissed employee.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

09. What are the risks to an employer making entry to the workplace conditional on an individual worker having received a covid-19 vaccination?

09. What are the risks to an employer making entry to the workplace conditional on an individual worker having received a covid-19 vaccination?

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France

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For employees for whom vaccination is not mandatory, employers cannot make entry to the workplace conditional on vaccination, nor can they threaten to dismiss the employee if they have not had the vaccine.

If an employer makes the return to the company premises conditional on vaccination, they are violating the employees’ privacy and medical confidentiality, and employees may freely refuse it. In case of dismissal, it could be judged null and void since it may violate the employee's privacy and medical secrecy.

On the other hand, for employees working in the above-mentioned establishments (bars, restaurants, department stores, shopping centres etc.), the employer may make the return of the employee to work conditional on the presentation of a health pass (either a negative PCR test, or proof of vaccination status concerning covid-19, or a certificate of recovery following a covid-19 contamination).

Finally, for health professionals, there will be no risk for the employer. The employer will be able to condition the return to the premises on proof of vaccination status.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Entry to the workplace could be conditioned on receiving a Covid-19 vaccination as a health and safety measure to prevent the spread of the virus. However, since vaccination is not mandatory, employees who have decided not to get vaccinated have the right to remain active and continue providing services at the employer’s premises or remotely without changes to their employment conditions.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

10. Are there some workplaces or specific industries or sectors in which the government has required that employers make access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination?

10. Are there some workplaces or specific industries or sectors in which the government has required that employers make access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination?

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France

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Please see above (questions 8 and 9) regarding the workplaces and specific industries concerned by making the access to the workplace conditional on individuals having received a Covid-19 vaccination.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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No, the government has released a covid-19 FAQ where they clarify that vaccination is not mandatory.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

11. What are the key privacy considerations employers face in relation to ascertaining and processing employee medical and vaccination information?

11. What are the key privacy considerations employers face in relation to ascertaining and processing employee medical and vaccination information?

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France

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Moreover, regarding the processing of data relating to an employee’s vaccination, the CNIL has not yet issued a directive on the specific subject of the processing of employee vaccination data by employers. Because of their sensitive nature, data relating to employee health are subject to special legal protection: they are in principle prohibited from being processed. Employers, therefore, may not keep a list of vaccinated employees, or disclose the names of those who do not wish to be vaccinated.

In fact, according to the CNIL, "because of their sensitive nature, data relating to a person's health are subject to special legal protection: they are in principle prohibited from being processed. In order to be processed, its use must necessarily fall within one of the exceptions provided for by the GDPR, thus guaranteeing a balance between the desire to ensure the security of individuals and respect for their rights and fundamental freedoms. Moreover, their sensitivity justifies that they be processed under very strong conditions of security and confidentiality and only by those who are authorized to do so.

The exceptions that can be used in the context of work are limited and can generally be based on either :

  • the need for the employer to process this data to meet its obligations in terms of labour law, social security and social protection: this is the case for the processing of reports by employees,
  • the need for a health professional to process such data for the purposes of preventive or occupational medicine, (health) assessment of the worker's capacity to work, medical diagnoses etc.

For these reasons, employers who would like to initiate any steps aimed at ascertaining the state of health of their employees must rely on the occupational health services.

The CNIL points out that only competent health personnel (in particular occupational medicine) may collect, implement and access any medical forms or questionnaires from employees/agents containing data relating to their health or information relating in particular to their family situation, their living conditions or their possible movements"

However, we find these exceptions difficult to apply in the context of covid-19.

For employees subject to mandatory vaccination, the law allows the employer, or regional health agency if applicable, to store the result of the check on the proof of vaccination status.

Please note that the employer may not keep the proof of vaccination. In other words, the employer may not keep the QR code, only the “Yes/No” result of the test. Keeping the result is limited in time (currently until 15 November 2021).

The information thus collected is personal data subject to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Under the Federal Law for the Protection of Personal Data in Possession of Private Individuals or Entities, employers may obtain and treat employees’ personal data without having to obtain consent if such information is required for compliance with employers’ and employees’ obligations. As employers are obliged to implement all necessary measures to prevent workplace accidents and disease outbreaks, we believe that employers are entitled to gather and process such information, if required, to comply with these obligations. Employers must always treat this information and data as confidential.

Notwithstanding the above, employers must provide or make available to employees the data privacy notice through which it is established that their data, including but not limited to health information, may be gathered and processed to comply with the obligations derived from the employment relationship.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

12. What are the key health and safety considerations for employers in respect of remote workers?

12. What are the key health and safety considerations for employers in respect of remote workers?

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France

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The health and safety considerations for employers in respect of remote workers are the following:

  • Modes of work time control or workload regulation;
  • Determination of the time slots during which the employer can usually contact the remote worker to respect the right to disconnect and the right to privacy;
  • Organise an annual meeting to discuss working conditions and workload; and
  • Evaluate professional risks, in particular those linked to the employee's distance from the colleagues and regulating the use of digital tools.
Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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The 2019 reform on teleworking provides for specific protection to ensure workers' health and safety rights. A Mexican Official Standard Regulation (NOM) must be published within 18 months of the enactment of the Reform; however, the authorities have not issued any additional provisions yet.

The only current and relevant obligation for employers with remote workers related to health and safety is to register their employees at the IMSS. Registration with the IMSS ensures standard health and safety protection, such as the applicable framework for other workers. Further, employers must guarantee a safe working environment, and provide adequate equipment to render services. Nevertheless, executing a written agreement with remote employees stating their sole and individual responsibility for ensuring that they are fulfilling their work duties in a safe environment has become standard practice.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

13. How has the pandemic impacted employers’ obligations vis-à-vis worker health and safety beyond the physical workplace?

13. How has the pandemic impacted employers’ obligations vis-à-vis worker health and safety beyond the physical workplace?

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France

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The pandemic does not strictly speaking have an impact on employers' obligations towards workers' health and safety beyond the physical workplace. But the National Interprofessional Agreement on remote status was renegotiated on 26 November 2020 and strongly raised awareness among employers on those issues to:

  • Communicate within the work community;
  • Adapt the managerial practices: trust and definition of clear objectives;
  • Train managers and employees;
  • Maintain social ties and prevent employees from isolation: it is useful to plan group time, to set up remote communication means to facilitate exchanges, to assist in case of difficulties with computer tools, etc; and
  • Make available to all employees, including those working from home, relevant contacts so that employees in vulnerable situations can use them.
Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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No additional employer obligations concerning health and safety beyond the physical workplace have emerged as a consequence of the pandemic, except for the requirement that employers who conduct non-essential activities carry out their operations remotely.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

14. Do employer health and safety obligations differ between mobile workers and workers based primarily at home?

14. Do employer health and safety obligations differ between mobile workers and workers based primarily at home?

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France

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No, the legal and conventional provisions on health and safety at work apply to both mobile workers and workers based primarily at home. It must be taken into account that the employer cannot have complete control over the place where teleworking is carried out and the environment, which is part of the private sphere. This implies an occupational risk assessment adapted to the case of mobile workers and the case of workers based primarily at home.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Regarding health and safety obligations, no distinction exists to date between mobile workers and workers based primarily at home.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

15. To what extent are employers responsible for the mental health and wellbeing of workers who are working remotely?

15. To what extent are employers responsible for the mental health and wellbeing of workers who are working remotely?

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France

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Employers are liable within the limits of their obligations (see question 12). As long as employers respect these obligations, in case of litigation, it will be up to the employee to demonstrate that the deterioration of their health is related to the employer's failure to respect its obligations.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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Specifically, NOM-035 sets forth the necessary mechanism for employees to prevent psychosocial risk factors in the workplace, promote a healthy working environment, and how to evaluate their compliance. NOM-035 must be implemented regarding both mobile workers and workers based primarily at home.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

17. To what extent have employers been able to make changes to their organisations during the pandemic, including by making redundancies and/or reducing wages and employee benefits?

17. To what extent have employers been able to make changes to their organisations during the pandemic, including by making redundancies and/or reducing wages and employee benefits?

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France

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During the pandemic, employers were able to carry out reorganisations involving collective redundancies for economic reasons (subject to justifying a real and serious economic reason as defined by article L.1233-3 of the labour code).

They were also able to negotiate collective performance agreements to meet the needs linked to the operation of the company or to preserve or develop employment by adjusting the working hours of employees, remuneration, and determining the conditions of professional or geographical mobility within the company.

Employers may also have to negotiate or renegotiate agreements or charters on remote status or review their organisation by developing a co-working space, different from the company’s premises, on a regular or occasional basis or in case of exceptional circumstances or force majeure.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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The federal government have reinforced the protective labour laws that prohibit redundancies and salary reduction as a general rule, stating that that the pandemic would not give legal cause for suspension of employment or dismissal. However, many employers managed to negotiate directly with unions or employees and introduced reduced temporary terms and conditions of employment that enabled companies to remain in business.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

18. What actions, if any, have unions or other worker associations taken to protect the entitlements and rights of remote workers?

18. What actions, if any, have unions or other worker associations taken to protect the entitlements and rights of remote workers?

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France

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In general, employees and new works council members have a right to alert and withdraw from any situation which they have reasonable grounds to believe presents a serious and imminent danger to their life or health (article L.4131-1 and L.4121-2 of the labour code).

Apart from these actions, the new works council or the unions will always have the ability to report to the employer any malfunction affecting the entitlements and rights of remote workers.

In any case, please note that employees who wish to terminate their status as a remote worker will have priority to assume resume a non-teleworking position that corresponds to their professional qualifications and skills and to inform the employer of the availability of any such position (article L.1222-10 of the labour code).

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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The unions have remained pro-business during the pandemic and have been flexible with the modification of working schedules, temporary stoppages, reduced terms and conditions of employment and avoidance of strikes. The pandemic regulations allowed the most important economic activities to continue during the crucial stages of the pandemic, and unions agreed to implement immediate teleworking schemes. Many of the provisions of the 2021 reform on teleworking were developed in practice by employers and union representatives during negotiations.  

Last updated on 21/09/2021

19. Are employers required to consult with, or otherwise involve, the relevant union when introducing a remote-working arrangement? If so, how much influence does the union and/or works council have to alter the working arrangement (for example, to ensure workers’ health and safety is protected during any period of remote work)?

19. Are employers required to consult with, or otherwise involve, the relevant union when introducing a remote-working arrangement? If so, how much influence does the union and/or works council have to alter the working arrangement (for example, to ensure workers’ health and safety is protected during any period of remote work)?

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France

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Remote-working is implemented within a collective agreement negotiated with the unions or, failing that, within a charter drawn up by the employer after the opinion of the new works council if it exists (article L.1222-9 of the labour code).

The collective agreement or, failing that, the charter drawn up by the employer specifies:

  • The conditions for switching to remote status, in particular in case of a pollution episode, and the conditions for returning to performance of the employment contract without remote working;
  • The terms of acceptance by the employee of the conditions of implementation of remote status;
  • The modes of control of the working time or regulation of the workload;
  • The determination of the time slots during which the employer can usually contact the remote worker; and
  • The modes of access to a telework organisation for disabled workers.

The way of negotiation seems to be prioritised by the legislature. Apart from those mandatory clauses, the social partners have every interest in being a force of proposals, which will be accepted or refused by the employer. If the unions refuse to sign the agreement, the employer may provide for these measures in the framework of a charter, which it may implement after the opinion of the new works council (non-binding opinion).

Finally, in the absence of a collective agreement or charter, when the employee and the employer agree to telework, they may formalise their agreement by any means.

Last updated on 21/09/2021

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Mexico

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By legal definition, teleworking must be included in the respective collective bargaining agreement (CBA). The terms and conditions of the CBA for teleworkers shall include all the relevant and special conditions of the services. Teleworkers enjoy equal rights when compared to those applicable to standard employees, including training, salary, health, social security and the right to remain employed. The implementation of teleworking is voluntary and must be agreed in writing; therefore, it is negotiated by unions. However, teleworking can be unilaterally determined by the employer in the presence of force majeure that impedes the continuity of standard services.  

Last updated on 21/09/2021