New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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Netherlands

  • at Rutgers & Posch
  • at Rutgers & Posch

Employees who process data at home could create a data leak if they lose the data or improperly dispose of it after it is no longer useful for the company or their work. It is also more difficult to protect digital data in a non-professional setting and a private network might be more vulnerable to breaches. If a data breach does occur, the employee should, in principle, report this to the Dutch Data Protection Authority within 72 hours.

Employers are advised to update data protection policies to take into account remote working, and should also consider any data protection issues that may arise from an employee moving to work outside of The Netherlands.

Last updated on 08/03/2022

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

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Netherlands

  • at Rutgers & Posch
  • at Rutgers & Posch

In principle, this is not the case unless the individual employee provides his consent therewith. However, special allowances for the reimbursement of expenses that become obsolete due to working from home (e.g, travel expenses) may no longer apply in individual cases.

Last updated on 08/03/2022