New Ways of Working

Explore and keep track of key legal and compliance considerations for multinational employers as new ways of working become increasingly embedded as the pandemic begins to recede. Learn more about the response taken in specific countries or build your own report to compare approaches taken around the world.

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02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

02. Outline the key data protection risks associated with remote working in your jurisdiction.

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Argentina

  • at MBB Balado Bevilacqua
  • at MBB Balado Bevilacqua
  • at MBB Balado Bevilacqua

There is no specific statutory regulation on this matter related to employees under the home office framework. However, it is advisable to create a clear general policy on data protection or include in employment agreements provisions regarding data protection in order to clarify to employees the extent of their obligation. We recommend executing those documents in Spanish, due to the protective nature of local labour law; if there is a conflict with employees, a labour court is likely to dismiss all documents in a foreign language.

As a result, the Personal Data Protection Law (PDPL), Law No. 25,326, establishes the full protection of personal information recorded in personal files, registers, banks, or other technical means of data storage and processing. Therefore, employers must comply with the PDPL and take steps to ensure that this law applies throughout their organisation.

The main aspects of the PDPL are:

  1. The purpose of collecting employee data must be communicated to employees and written consent needs to be obtained.
  2. However, consent is not required if the data has been obtained from a public source; collected for the performance of the state’s duties; consists of lists limited to name, ID number, tax or social security identification, occupation, date of birth, domicile, and telephone number; or arises from a contractual relationship, either scientific or professional, of the data owner, and are necessary for its development or fulfilment.
  3. In addition, this Law establishes the employee’s right to access and modify any incorrect or false information. Furthermore, the collection of information related to an employee’s private life is permissible as long as the information collected complies with the following requirements: it is not used for discriminatory purposes; it does not violate the individual’s right to privacy; and it is reasonably used.
  4. When an employer requests personal data from an employee, they must be notified in advance and in an express and clear manner about: the purpose for which the data needs to be processed and who can use such data; the existence of the relevant data file or register, whether electronic or otherwise, and the identity and domicile of the responsible person; the compulsory or discretionary character of the information requested; the consequences of providing the data, of refusing to provide such data, or if it is inaccurate; and the data owner’s rights to data access, rectification, and suppression.
  5. Indeed, the processing of personal data requires express consent from the data owner, which must be accompanied by appropriate information, prominently and expressly explaining the nature of consent sought. This can be achieved by the employee signing a general consent form on entering employment. However, consent may be withdrawn by an employee.
  6. Various restrictions apply to the disclosure of personal data to third parties. This is generally only allowed if it is in the legitimate interests of the database owner (eg, the employer) and the data owner (eg, the employee) has consented. This consent can be revoked at any time by the data owner.
  7. The transfer of personal data to another country – which does not guarantee a proper level of data protection – is forbidden. Nevertheless, such prohibition is not applied when the individuals, whose personal information is intended to be transferred, give their express written consent.

All data regarding employees’ health is sensitive information, so the employer must get the express authorisation of the employee for any transfer of such date, and employers should stop or restrict the transfer to other companies or its employees that lack sufficient clearance to deal with health information, including covid-19 information.

Last updated on 13/07/2022

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

06. Do employers have any scope to reduce the salaries and/or benefits of employees who work remotely?

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Argentina

  • at MBB Balado Bevilacqua
  • at MBB Balado Bevilacqua
  • at MBB Balado Bevilacqua

The home office framework establishes that teleworking employees have the same rights and duties as those working at an employer’s main offices (including union rights), and their salary must not be less than what they would receive if they worked at an employer’s offices. Therefore, once employees are assigned to remote working, their compensation cannot be reduced due to this change.

In general terms, employers have the right to redesign or reassign job responsibilities. Such a right is known as an employer’s right to modify labour conditions (Ius Variandi). In this sense, local laws allow unilateral amendments to terms and conditions of the employment contract provided they do not adversely affect essential labour conditions and do not cause any moral or material damage to the employee and the changes are reasonable.

As a result, if an employer unilaterally decides to reduce the salaries or benefits of remote workers, and the change is considered to be unreasonable, resulting in material or moral damage to the employee involved, he or she can file an injunction to restore the original conditions of employment. If the employer refuses to do so, the employee may claim constructive dismissal and file for severance compensation and any applicable fines.

Last updated on 13/07/2022